Physics
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Electric Flux and Electric Field Lines, Flux Density, Flux Energy

2 minutes long
Posted by Mahak Jain, 18/8/2021
Electric Flux and Electric Field Lines, Flux Density, Flux Energy

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Consider flow of a liquid with velocity v, through a small flat surface dS, in a direction normal to the surface. The rate of flow of liquid is given by the volume crossing the area per unit time v dS and represents the flux of liquid flowing across the plane. If the normal to the surface is not parallel to the direction of flow of liquid, i.e., to v, but makes an angle θ with it, the projected area in a plane perpendicular to v is δ dS cos θ. Therefore, the flux going out of the surface dS is v.nˆ dS. For the case of the electric field, we define an analogous quantity and call it electric flux. We should, however, note that there is no flow of a physically observable quantity unlike the case of liquid flow.

In the picture of electric field lines described above, we saw that the number of field lines crossing a unit area, placed normal to the field at a point is a measure of the strength of electric field at that point. This means that if we place a small planar element of area ∆S normal to E at a point, the number of field lines crossing it is proportional* to E ∆S. Now suppose we tilt the area element by angle θ. Clearly, the number of field lines crossing the area element will be smaller. The projection of the area element normal to E is ∆S cosθ. Thus, the number of field lines crossing ∆S is proportional to E ∆S cosθ. When θ = 90°, field lines will be parallel to ∆S and will not cross it at all.


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